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Openfit vs Beachbody Review

About Openfit

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Until we wait for the invention of robotic personal trainers, we can at least make do with the Openfit app. This mobile feature offers 350+ live workout classes and informative nutritional plans to help you get back to shape.

Openfit is owned by founder Jon Congdon, who started as a yoga practitioner and professional volleyball player in his formative years. He was always on his feet, which served as the brand’s initial ‘go-getter’ attitude.

Openfit, in Congdon’s eyes, will always be an engaging place for users to better themselves. It’s a widely accessible membership, as customers can download it via Apple, Android, FireTV, Chromecast, and Samsung Smart TV.

With its headquarters based in Santa Monica, California, Openfit has grown a considerable fan following since its debut in 2018. This is best expressed through the brand’s 150k following on Instagram. It has also been featured in various media outlets, including Business Wire and CNET.

About Beachbody

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Staying in shape takes a lot of commitment—but it shouldn’t have to be difficult. Case in point, the Beachbody app allows users to stay on track of their health goals in an easy-to-use format.

This online subscription plan hosts 2,700+ on-demand videos and 440+ live-stream workouts. It’s one of the hottest fitness apps on the market, as the company is about 3 million strong in subscriber count.

Beachbody is actually the parent company of Openfit. It’s headed by co-founders Jon Congdon and Carl Daikeler, who established the brand in 1998.

Also based in Santa Monica, California, Beachbody leads with the same mentality as Openfit: “To help people achieve their goals and enjoy healthy, fulfilling lives.

Over the years, Beachbody has taken the internet by storm. Its Instagram page boasts over 1.1 million followers, and publications like CNET and The Hollywood Reporter have also picked up on Beachbody’s success.

Guys, we’re living in the digital age. Everything is basically handed to us on a silver platter—whether that be the convenience of online shopping or the immediacy of direct messaging. Naturally, the health industry has evolved as well, which brings us down to its latest creation: Openfit and Beachbody.

So, what app should you download? To help save space on your phone, this Openfit vs Beachbody review will provide a side-by-side comparison of both of these brands.

What to Consider

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Target audience

Fitness apps are made for exercise geeks, right? In some way, you’re right—but in most cases, exercise memberships are targeted at people who are trying to reach their workout goals. You don’t have to be a gym rat to download Openfit and Beachbody.

If anything, both companies are designed to be convenient for busy bees. Reasons can also entail weight loss, a revival of confidence, or physical or mental rehabilitation.

Range of goals

As you’ve probably already picked up, goals are indicative of the type of user you are. It seems that Openfit and Beachbody cater to the same groups, as they offer different objectives organized into various workout/nutrition programs. This includes features related to weight loss, strength training, body slimming, added flexibility, and general fitness.

Subscription flexibility

Nobody likes commitment—and just to be clear, I’m talking about subscriptions, not relationships. A good membership will offer some degree of flexibility, whether that be pausing, skipping, or canceling ongoing fees. It’s also important to consider any commitment periods, as some brands will only offer monthly or yearly plans.

Extras

Like a cherry on top of a sundae, everybody loves extras. It’s always a plus if a subscription plan offers any bonuses. This may include community forums, nutritional guidelines, or even a wider amount of compatibility with paired devices.

Accessibility

Price and app availability are important points to consider. Nobody wants to pay an outrageous monthly fee. In addition, companies should be available to download in various countries. A good fitness brand will both be affordable and highly accessible.

Openfit vs Beachbody: How Do They Work?

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Exercise and diet should never be challenging to maintain. To help simplify the process, Openfit and Beachbody act as your personal trainer to help you keep track of your fitness goals.

Of course, to maintain user commitment, both apps should be fairly easy to handle—and fortunately, they don’t disappoint.

To keep things easy to read, this Openfit vs Beachbody review will provide a side-by-side view of how both apps work.

Openfit:

  • Every subscription starts with a sign-up process. The brand will ask you how long you’d like your membership for, as this includes a 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month plan.
  • New members have to fill out a preliminary quiz. Questions include your fitness goals, body statistics, and if you work out regularly.
  • After logging in, customers are entitled to unlimited access to their workout classes and nutritional programs. You also receive professional advice and access to the brand’s community forum.
  • At Openfit, you can work out whenever you want. It’s up to you whether you want to commit to 10 minutes of exercise or a 2-hour workout class.
  • Users can choose to turn on their cameras to get one-on-one feedback from their virtual workout instructor.
Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Beachbody:

  • Offers a 14-day free trial for new members. Once the term is over, customers must choose between a 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month plan.
  • The app will suggest some preliminary workout programs for users to try. This is organized by difficulty and goal, which may include strength training, muscle toning, burning fat, etc.
  • Some fitness classes are available to download so that you can stream programs without WIFI.
  • Provides nutritional programs that are created around Beachbody’s portion control containers and supplements. These add-ons are completely optional.
  • Has a support team of coaches that provide one-on-one support. Also offers a community forum.

Since Beachbody owns Openfit, it may be difficult for first-time users to distinguish any differences. According to several sources online, it appears that Beachbody offers a wider selection of programs than its subsidiary brand.

But, if we’re talking about features like nutritional trackers, subscription plan flexibility, and one-on-one support, both brands are fairly similar.

Openfit vs Beachbody: Apps

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Unless you’re okay with ‘app bouncing,’ it’s best that developers include all the necessary features that customers will need when using their app. This bodes especially true for fitness brands, as it’s important to offer a wide selection of programs for dieting and exercise.

Thankfully, Openfit and Beachbody both are commendable when it comes to their expansive collections of workout classes and nutritional plans.

Can’t manage to spot the differences between these two apps? Save your sweat for the gym—as this Openfit vs Beachbody review will offer a comparative list for both brands.

Openfit App:

  • 350+ live classes per week: Led by a professional trainer and provides users with one-on-one feedback. This includes the 10-Minute Booty Work routine, the Cardio: HIIT program, the 10-Minute Abs training session, and more.
  • Hundreds of on-demand classes: All routines are taught by world-class professionals. Examples include 4 Weeks of Focus with Shay Mitchell, Xtend Barre, and Beginner Pilates with Lisa Hubbard.
  • Community access: Users can interact with other members in the Openfit Facebook group. It’s a great forum to help reinvigorate inspiration and motivation.
  • App messaging: Considered an add-on to Openfit’s virtual classes, users can message their instructors for feedback or questions.
  • Openfit nutrition: Provides a 1-minute meal plan that offers personalized recommendations that are aligned with your health goals. Also offers a diet tracker and a recipe guide.
  • LADDER partnership: Has add-ons in the form of protein powders, supplements, and green smoothies.
  • Available virtually everywhere: Openfit is compatible with IOS, Android, Roku, Apple TV, FireTV, Chromecast, and Samsung Smart TV.
Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Beachbody App:

  • 15,000+ workout programs: Includes live and on-demand classes like the 21 Day Fix, the Barre Blend, and the Morning Meltdown 100.
  • Free coaching: All memberships offer real-time access to a professional trainer. They’ll help you find programs best suited to fulfilling your fitness goals.
  • Nutritional plans: Offers free recipes, meal prep tips, cooking shows, and other useful resources on how to maintain a healthy diet.
  • Includes lots of add-ons: Some workout programs and nutritional programs are designed around certain products, such as the Portion Control containers, Shakeology, and the Beachbody performance supplements.
  • Community forum: Like Openfit, users can find motivation and inspo by conversing with other members.
  • Compatible with multiple devices. Beachbody can be accessed through IOS, Android, Google Chromecast, FireTV, Roku, and Apple TV.

Openfit and Beachbody are quite similar when it comes to their integrated features. They both offer nutritional programs, hundreds of live and on-demand classes, and a helpful community forum that users can access.

After close inspection, it seems that they’re relatively different regarding add-ons. For instance, Openfit is compatible with LADDER, while Beachbody comes with more bonuses—being Portion Control and Shakeology, of course.

Openfit vs Beachbody: Workouts

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Workout burnout is a lot more common than you think. It’s easy to get bored of doing the same exercise routine over and over again. With that in mind, having a wide selection of training sessions is essential to maintaining a monthly, if not yearly, fitness commitment.

When joining a live class, Openfit users are encouraged to ready their exercise space by including a yoga mat, a water bottle, or a set of dumbbells, depending on the program. You should log in 3 minutes before the start of each session. It’s up to you whether to turn on your camera to help the instructor give you real-time feedback.

Beachbody’s pre-workout recommendations are relatively the same, but members are directed to take their measurements before and after each class. This is to track your progress. Users will need to measure their arms, chest, waist, hips, and legs.

To help readers get a taste of what each brand offers, this Openfit vs Beachbody review will feature a few of their all-time popular classes for users to compare.

Openfit Workouts:

XB Pilates 

Attaining that coveted, slim-fit figure isn’t far from reach. The XB Pilates class is a cardio-based exercise program that can help improve your posture. Led by Andrea Rodgers, this training session keeps things calm and meditative while also pushing you to your limits. This is one of Openfit’s live classes, as members can get real-time feedback as they work out.

Rough Around the Edges

If you really want to get your blood pumping, I highly recommend giving the Rough Around the Edges program a try. It’s a high-energy training program that involves kickboxing and karate-inspired exercises.

Taught by a team of professional stuntwomen, this is the exercise regimen to opt for if you want to get a surge of female empowerment. Members can use the class to lose weight, strengthen their muscles, and improve their agility skills.

Yoga52 

The Yoga52 Openfit class is designed to increase flexibility, improve posture, and most importantly—prompt relaxation. This online session doesn’t require much commitment, as it’s divided into three courses that you play in your own time.

Practitioners can look forward to the 30-day yoga challenge, the 8-day regimen, or the rigorous 52-week class schedule for those who really want to get fit. It’s led by five professional instructors: Odette Hughes, Brent Laffoon, Micki Duran, David Regelin, and Marie Grujicic.

Tough Mudder T-Minus 30

If you’re the type that likes to hit the ground running, I’d recommend trying out the Tough Mudder T-Minus 30 session at Openfit. Designed to last 30 days, this sweat-inducing class is taught by Hunter McIntyre. The course entails strength, endurance, mobility, and speed training to help users attain a leaner physique.

600 Secs

Pressed for time? Don’t use it as an excuse to have another cheat day. Instead, the 600 Secs class promises a sweat-inducing training session consisting of 40 different workouts.

It includes exercises for the arms, legs, core, and booty, which are designed to burn fat and increase muscle tone. It’s worth noting that users will need dumbbells and resistance bands to complete this regimen.

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Beachbody Workouts:

YOUv2

Considered an introductory course for new Beachbody members, YOUv2 keeps things relatively straightforward by teaching the basics. It’s four weeks of cardio-dance routines, which feature a bunch of classic ‘80s to ‘90s hits that get your heart racing.

Users will also be given a paired nutrition program, which only implements small changes to help make the transition period faster.

Barre Blend

Full-body workouts are the best way to keep you energized. Case in point, the Barre Blend workout program entails a low-impact session of pilates, interval cardio training, and core work to help users get in shape.

It’s partly inspired by co-creator Elise Joan’s background in yoga, as this class looks to increase agility, flexibility, and strength. Barre Blend lasts for eight weeks, but subscribers only need to work out for a max of 40 minutes per day.

3-Week Yoga Retreat

Taught by Vytas, Elise, Ted, and Faith, the 3-Week Yoga Retreat promises a meditative experience composed of breathing, balance, and stress-relieving. Don’t worry; you also get a bit of strength training too, as users can improve their flexibility and mobility during each course. And like all Yoga classes, members are required to practice on a mat.

Morning Meltdown 100

Want to make the most of your a.m hours? The Morning Meltdown offers a short set of workouts made to increase one’s metabolism while burning fat.

It requires 20 to 30 minutes per session for a max of 100 days. But, it’s ultimately up to you when you’d like to participate, as this is an on-demand class. In addition, Morning Meltdown 100 is one of the few courses that are set by BPM.

30 Day Breakaway:

Winter is coming, but that shouldn’t mean putting those running shoes to rest. The 30 Day Breakaway acts as the next best thing, as users can train in the comfort of their own homes.

Treadmill compatible, this cardio and weight loss class offers resistance training and lifting for five days per week. But don’t worry; you only need to work out for just 30 to 40 minutes per session.

Openfit and Beachbody are quite similar when it comes to the variety of workout programs they offer. Of course, there will be differences in class times and course syllabuses. If anything, Beachbody organizes its sessions by difficulty, as members can choose classes categorized by beginner, intimidate, and advanced.

Openfit vs Beachbody: Price & Value

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Value only goes as far as its price. There’s only so much I’d be willing to pay for a subscription program. To ‘rip the band-aid,’ so to speak, in this Openfit vs Beachbody review I will outline the costs for both of these fitness apps down below.

Openfit:

  • Free 14-day trial
  • 12-month subscription: $8 per month
  • 6-month subscription: $10 per month 
  • 3-month subscription: $13 per month 

Beachbody:

  • Free 14-day trial
  • 12-month subscription (plus BODi 30-day trial): $99 in total
  • 12-month subscription of BOD and BODi: $298 in total
  • 6-month subscription (no BODi): $78
  • 3-month subscription (no BODi): $60

If you haven’t picked up on the difference between these two fitness apps yet, here’s the main kicker. Openfit is more affordable compared to its competitor. It’s a standard option for those who just want to get started with exercise, as they offer a decent amount of programs for a reasonable price.

Beachbody entails a heavier expense, but that’s partially due to the brand’s wider selection of workout sessions. Most of its memberships include BODi, which is an interactive app that introduces more features than the brand’s original subscription plans.

Openfit vs Beachbody: How To Sign Up

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

For those who’ve already settled on a fitness app, you’re probably wondering if the sign-up process is quick and easy, or if it entails an entire afternoon clicking and typing. This Openfit vs Beachbody review will outline each brand’s log-in process for newbies to compare.

Openfit:

  1. Download the Openfit app on the App Store or Google Play
  2. Choose your membership plan
  3. Fill out your account by inputting your email, password, and phone number
  4. Complete the profile (entails questions regarding your workout routine and overall health goals)

Beachbody:

  1. Download the Beachbody app on your chosen device
  2. Choose your subscription plan
  3. Input your name, email address, password, and country to make an account

Yep, signing in for both apps only takes a couple of minutes. There’s no fine print to read, as your credit card isn’t immediately charged right after you make an account. This Openfit vs Beachbody review awards two thumbs up for both of these brands.

Openfit vs Beachbody: What Do Customers Think?

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Openfit and Beachbody seem to be the ‘cream of the crop’ regarding fitness apps. It’s hard to ignore their collective fanbases on Instagram, but let’s not forget: hype isn’t indicative of whether a brand is good or not.

For a more in-depth look, this Openfit vs Beachbody review will feature a summary of ratings and common customer feedback to help readers settle in on a final decision.

Openfit:

  • Facebook: 113 reviews with 3.6/5 stars
  • Appgrooves: 22k+ reviews with 4.9/5 stars
  • Amazon: 595 reviews with 4.5/5 stars
  • The App Store: 20k ratings with 4.9/5 stars
  • Google Play: 1,340 reviews with 4.1/5 stars

Common customer feedback:

  • Offered a great workout experience at an affordable price
  • Convenient and easy to use
  • Had a great team of professional and supportive coaches
  • Features like pre-recorded classes, community tabs, and amount of short workout sessions proved useful for many members
  • Some technical issues with the app alongside customer service complaints
  • Frustrations in changing their subscription plans

Beachbody:

  • Facebook: 1,442 reviews with 4/5 stars
  • Consumer affairs: 498 reviews with 3.9/5 stars
  • Trustpilot: 345 reviews with 3.3/5 stars
  • The App Store: 44k reviews with 4.8/5 stars
  • Google Play: 23k reviews with 4.7/5 stars

Common customer feedback:

  • Proved convenient and effective in helping users get back in shape
  • Coaches were motivational and supportive
  • Allowed members to work out whenever and wherever they want
  • Its large selection of exercise programs seemed to be a plus
  • Some connectivity issues with devices (such as Apple TV)
  • Reports of crashing and videos taking too long to load
  • Subscriptions were too expensive and customers had problems canceling them

After doing a bit of research, it seems that the hype for Openfit and Beachbody isn’t completely unfounded. It’s not uncommon that apps run into technical issues, but they’re something worth considering before deciding to download. But, as per the thousands of reviews posted online, both fitness apps appear to be well worth the cost.

Openfit vs Beachbody: Promotions & Discounts

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

Everybody loves a good deal, which is why this Openfit vs Beachbody review has scoured the internet in search of money-saving hacks.

Unfortunately, it seems that Openfit isn’t very ‘open’ in terms of offering promotions or sales. Aside from their 14-day free trial, it appears that they only provide a student discount worth 20% off.

Beachbody, on the other hand, is very active in offering promo codes and coupons. This includes:

  • Apparel Cyber and Holiday Sale: Offered at a limited time only. Discounts are as low as 80% off
  • Buy one get free shipping on any apparel item
  • Customers can get the Job 1 Timeless Tank and get 20% off plus free shipping. They must input promo code: SPOTLIGHT to take advantage of this deal
  • The BODi day pass allows members to try BOD and BODi for 24 hours
  • Members can get $300 off their MYX bike by using promo code: BEACHBODYMYX at checkout

With deals as hot as this, it seems that Beachbody is the winner of this segment—right? Considering that it’s one of the more costly fitness apps on the market, it appears that it needs to offer promotions to counteract its expensive price point. Again, Openfit is a more affordable subscription plan, which probably outweighs the need for any sales or discounts.

Who Will You Shop With?

Openfit vs Beachbody Review

So, have you settled on a fitness app yet? This Openfit vs Beachbody review has covered all the basics that new users need to know before settling on a decision. But, I’m sure that a few of you are still on the fence about what brand to support. If it’s any consolation, I’ll provide a final rundown.

Openfit is convenient, effective, and suitable for beginners. It’s a great app for those who aren’t incredibly serious when it comes to working out but still want the quality of a professionally run class. Aside from its affordability, members can easily peruse hundreds of exercise and nutritional programs with ease.

Beachbody seems to be for gym rats only, but that’s not to exclude any self-determined novices out there. Yes, it’s expensive, but that’s to account for the wider selection of programs as well as select add-ons such as the Portion Control containers and Shakeology. Let’s not forget that they also sell apparel and exercise machines as well.

At the end of the day, I think we can all agree that Openfit and Beachbody are commendable fitness apps. They both win my vote when it comes to convenience and quality.


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